TMJ – The Root of Your Pain

Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a really long name … so let’s call it TMJ. Ah, yes, that’s right, now the name is more familiar! You’ve heard it before. Maybe even some lingering pain in your chewing muscles and bones has you wondering if you’ve got it.

TMJ dysfunction is sometimes called TMD, TMJD, or TMJ Syndrome if there seems to be a collection of related issues with your jaw. Dr. Shih at Waterloo Heights Dental Center is here to tell you more about TMJ and what to do if you’ve got it.

What is TMJ?

A sailboat requires a complex system of ropes, pulleys, and hooks to catch a wind in the sail and get moving. Your jaw is also made of an incredible team of muscles, bones, joints and tissue in order to function. If anything affects any one part of these pieces in your jaw, it could lead to chronic pain and problems with the joints in your jaw. TMJ is a broad term that includes any of this pain of dysfunction.

TMJ can feel like anything from a headache to an inner ear infection. The pain can move from your face and head down to your neck and shoulders. If you have TMJ, talking, chewing and yawning can be very uncomfortable. You might also hear clicking in your jaw, feel your jaw lock in place, or experience muscle spasms.

Because TMJ has a variety of symptoms, it can be confusing to tell if you have it. A dentist will absolutely be able to help just by looking into your mouth. A comprehensive dentist who is trained in assessing not only your mouth, but your lifestyle and whole body may be especially helpful for diagnosing and treating TMJ.

Who Gets TMJ?

Did you know that more women report having TMJ than men? Otherwise, there are a few risk factors that increase your chance of having TMJ:

  • Grinding Teeth: you may or may not know for sure if you grind your teeth (especially in your sleep) but one sure way to know is if your teeth are visibly getting shorter. This pressure and movement can cause jaw problems.
  • Stress: if you have a stressful job or if your jaw problems crop up during especially stressful times in life, clenching your mouth is a mindless habit that can cause TMJ.
  • Recent Dental Work: your body is a complete system and one part easily affects another. If you recently had dental work or any medical treatment in your face, it could be causing TMJ.
  • Poor Bite or Teeth Alignment: if your mouth doesn’t close in a healthy line or if you have severely crooked teeth, it could be putting extra pressure on your jaw.
  • Arthritis: joint inflammation or another connective tissues disease anywhere else in your body puts you at risk for the same soreness in your jaw.
  • Injury: a blow to the face or whiplash can easily put your mouth out of line and cause TMJ.

Treating TMJ

Your best bet for long-term treatment and pain reduction is to seek professional help. A dentist can offer a number of treatments (depending on your case) that can get rid of your TMJ. Some options are:

  • Home remedies like cold compress or gentle stretching
  • Orthodontics for better tooth and mouth alignment
  • Gently filing a thin layer off your teeth to improve alignment
  • Wearing a night guard to prevent grinding teeth in sleep
  • Dental Botox® and other muscle relaxers can help the jaw muscles loosen up, align better, and decrease pain

Don’t let pain interfere with your life. A combination of lifestyle changes and some help from your West Salem dentist can have you on the up and up for good. Call us today to make an appointment to treat your TMJ!

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tmj/symptoms-causes/dxc-20209401

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/t/tmj

As a general dentist with a special interest in cosmetic dentistry and implant restoration, I believe that a beautiful, healthy smile is a person’s greatest asset. I emphasize the need to establish good communication between the doctor and patient to achieve this goal. With a strong commitment to continuing education, I believes that it is important to stay abreast of the latest, cutting edge techniques and procedures in the area of cosmetic dentistry. I attended UCLA as an undergraduate and continued my education at the Northwestern University School of Dentistry, where I earned my Doctorate of Dental Surgery degree in 1977. I completed the Noblepharma Implant Mini-residency and hold Waterlase and Invisalign Advanced Certification. I am a member of the American Dental Association, The Wisconsin Dental Association, the Chicago Dental Society, the American Association of Women Dentists, and the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentists. A resident of the Stoughton area since 2008, I am active in my church and volunteer for Habitat for Humanity. I enjoy gourmet cooking, reading, gardening and traveling in my spare time. I am married with three grown children, all of whom currently live in Chicago.

Posted in Dental Health

Leave a Reply